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Archive for the ‘Medical’ Category

Dr. Greg Dunn (artist and neuroscientist) and Dr. Brian Edwards (artist and applied physicist) have created these beautiful artistic representations of neural pathways and other structures in the brain:

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Cover up

Ward + Robes is a fantastic campaign from the Canadian charity, the Starlight Children’s Foundation, to help teenagers feel less dehumanised in hospital.

The charity paired up creatives, including fashion designers, tattoo artists and an embroiderer, to design hospital gowns that allow for more personal expression.

Ward + Robes (great name) started at Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, Canada, and the aim is to bring the program to other hospitals throughout Canada next. If you want to help Starlight Children’s Foundation’s efforts, you can donate here:


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Inside out

Scientific illustrator Danny Quirk uses Sharpies and acrylic latex to create amazing anatomical illustrations on people’s bodies:

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Candy Anatomy is the creation of Mike McCormick, a 2nd year medical student at Glasgow University.

Although Mike describes it as “the ultimate form of procrastination”, his work has made the cover of the University of Glasgow Medical School Programme 2015/2016.

Recreating diagrams with sweets isn’t actually a bad way to fix them in your memory:

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Happy (late) Valentine’s from Lonac:

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 The Anatomage Table is a life-size 3D interactive virtual dissection table built in conjunction with the Stanford University’s Division of Clinical Anatomy.

The table allows you to interact with anatomy by using a virtual knife to cut away layers of the body at any angle, rotate the body in any direction, and also isolate structures. Labels follow as you turn the body around with your finger and different medical imaging view modes allow you to see the body as an X-ray with the anatomy overlaid on top.

It looks like a fantastic teaching device…

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